Opera & ballet
Symphony music
  • Simon Rattle and Berlin Philharmonic

    Simon Rattle and Berlin Philharmonic

    The Berlin Brahms Bombers victory tour came to a premature finish Tuesday night. The leader of the Berlin Philharmonic, Simon Rattle, received a hero’s excited welcome. The Second Symphony proved smashing, as had the first night from this inimitable orchestra’s two-evening visit to Walt Disney Concert Hall.

Chamber music
Instrumental Music
Vocal art
Persons
  • Ingo Metzmacher – I can’t believe it!

    Ingo Metzmacher – I can’t believe it!

    The well-known maestro, active propagandist of modern music, the one, who all Europe worships – Ingo Metzmacher has visited Moscow. Despite a number of possible difficulties – some heavy days, and, in addition, Friday 13, good luck has smiled to our magazine, and we managed to meet the adherent of modern music world and ask […]

Editor's Column
  • Stuart Lawson: «Time-proven Pursuit of Excellence»

    The hero of today’s interview is like no other. First, he is not a musician but a banker. But obviously he is not an ordinary banker as we are not a business publication and write only about things related to classical music. Stuart Lawson is CEO of HSBC Russia. The bank has won praise for […]

Dates of classical music
Russian composer files a response to Charles Ives

Russian composer files a response to Charles Ives

When american composer Charles Ives (1874-1954) composed a piece he called «The Unanswered Question» in 1906, he couldn’t have dreamed that a Russian composer

Nobel Prize Concert Classical Music

Nobel Prize Concert Classical Music

Nobel Media, in association with the Stockholm Concert Hall, is proud to present this year’s Nobel Prize Concert – an event of world class stature.

Dallas Symphony Orchestra – «Alexander Nevsky»

Dallas Symphony Orchestra – «Alexander Nevsky»

Sounds that kept provoking smells and colors: Thursday was synesthesia night at the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Prokofiev’s cantata based on his score for

Newsline

Russian composer files a response to Charles Ives

When american composer Charles Ives (1874-1954) composed a piece he called «The Unanswered Question» in 1906, he couldn’t have dreamed that a Russian composer

Nobel Prize Concert Classical Music

Nobel Media, in association with the Stockholm Concert Hall, is proud to present this year’s Nobel Prize Concert – an event of world class stature.

Dallas Symphony Orchestra – «Alexander Nevsky»

Sounds that kept provoking smells and colors: Thursday was synesthesia night at the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Prokofiev’s cantata based on his score for

Valda Wilson sings opera’s praises

It has been a busy year for Valda Wilson. As well as taking on the exacting role of Susanna in The Marriage of Figaro, the 27-year-old soprano was a semi-finalist

Russian Repertoire at the Vienna Opera

Russian Repertoire at the Vienna Opera

         

Production of Tchaikovsky’s “Eugene Onegin” in Vienna

The development of Russian art is impacted in a particularly significant way by the performance of Tchaikovsky’s music in Vienna, where the formation of XVIII century classical music culture took place. For the rest of the world, Vienna represents the personification of Mozart, whose genius Tchaikovsky so sincerely admired. Tchaikovsky himself strove to write as naturally and harmoniously, as the Austrian Classic managed to do.

Tchaikovsky’s Music in Vienna

P.I. Tchaikovsky visited Vienna in the 1880’s. His relationship with the city was complicated. On the one hand, Vienna captivated the composer with its world renowned  musical charm. On the other hand, Tchaikovsky’s music took a long time to reach the hearts of the Austrian concert going public.

For instance, the famous Austrian conductor Hans Richter and the Viennese Philharmonic Orchestra refused to perform his Third Symphony, considering it to be “too Russian”. The world premiere of his Violin Concerto occurred in Vienna in 1881, being conducted by Hans Richter, with the violinist Adolf Brodsky. Tchaikovsky’s music was harshly criticized by the music critic Eduard Hanslick, whose review was published in the Viennese paper Neue Freine Presse: “The violin…does not play, but scrapes, wails, and tears…we clearly see wild, vulgar faces, hear foul swearing, and smell vodka”.

In one of his letters to Nadezhda von Meck, Tchaikovsky said the following about the recently played concert: “Some writer described a painting as being so truly ugly, that it reeks; listening to Mr. Tchaikovsky’s music, one gets the sense that music too, can stink”.

Fortunately, the Austrian public was later able to appreciate the Russian composer’s musical legacy. At the end of the 19th century, the position of head conductor of the Vienna Opera was taken up by Gustav Mahler (1897-1907). Thanks to his reforms, the Wiener Staatsoper once again became one of the main centers of European art. During this period, under the direction of Gustav Mahler, a series of Tchaikovsky’s operas were staged [“Eugene Onegin”” (1897), “Iolanta” (1900), “The Queen of Spades” (1902)]. Till this day, the musical archive at the Vienna Opera has preserved copies of scores published during Tchaikovsky’s lifetime, which contain Gustav Mahler’s remarks.

Austrian-Russian cultural links

In our present day, cultural links between Austria and Russia have continued to develop. In 2015, the Viennese Philharmonic Orchestra came to the Tchaikovsky House Museum in Klin, to mark the opening of the composer’s 175 year anniversary celebration, performing his Fifth Symphony under the direction of Riccardo Muti.

Recently, in March of this year, at the Golden Hall of the Wiener Musikverein, the P.I. Tchaikovsky Symphony Orchestra performed a unique premier of Tchaikovsky’s little known opera “Undine”, which was recreated from existing fragments (the Russian premiere took place in 2015, in Klin and Moscow). It is known that the piece’s score was destroyed by the composer himself due to a conflict with Director of the Imperial Theaters. The opera’s musical material was then used by Tchaikovsky in various other pieces.

The joint Austrian-Russian project had a significant cultural resonance. It involved both Russian and Austrian performers: the actor Peter Matich (Austria), soprano Anna Aglatova, tenor Sergei Radchenko, the “Wiener Singverein” Choir (a Viennese singing group; lead by art director Johannes Prinz). It was conducted by Vladimir Fedoseev, who has contributed enormously to the development of Austrian-Russian cultural links: from 1997 to 2006, he was the head conductor of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra.

Unique qualities of dramaturgy and performance history of the opera “Eugene Onegin”

“Eugene Onegin” is an opera which possesses a rich performance tradition. Its fate has been tied with that of many of Russia’s greatest musicians. Its “lyrical scenes” have been interpreted by some of the most famous conductors and musicians, including: Gennady Rozhdestvensky, Yevgeny Kolobov, Vladimir Fedoseev, and Valery Gergiev.

Different versions of the opera have been staged by various renowned stage directors. For instance, at the Bolshoi Theater, the famous opera was staged by Boris Pokrovsky, with the role of Tatiana being performed by Galina Vishnevskaya. As is known, Galina Vishnevskaya herself admitted that working on the role of Tatiana with Boris Pokrovsky has transformed her notion of what opera theater is.

It’s worth pointing out that “Eugene Onegin” is a unique work within Russian music, in which the composer achieved a total unity between the beautiful images of Pushkin’s poetry and the melodic expression of its musical texture.

A detailed analysis of this phenomenon in Tchaikovsky’s opera can be found in a book by the well known Russian musicologist Boris Asafyev** titled « “Eugene Onegin”. P.I. Tchaikovsky’s Lyrical Scenes. An experiment in intonational analysis of style and musical dramaturgy ».

He is the author of the book “Musical Form as a Process” (the second part of which is titled “Intonation”). He is the founder of a method of form analysis in Russian musicology based on intonation, who also studied theoretical problems which deal with music’s unique characteristics, the process-like nature of musical form, as well as creating the “theory of intonation”.

This is why this opera possesses a “Romance-like expression”, both in its monologues, when the characters are “alone with their own thoughts”, and in its dialogues or “conversations”.  By giving his opera the subtitle “Lyrical scenes”, Tchaikovsky created a Russian lyrical and physiological drama. The opera is particularly difficult to stage, specifically due to the fact that, Tchaikovsky’s opera-writing style does not typically feature operatic and stage performance-like affects. As the book’s author points out: “An important trait of the music is its connection with the Romance genre. The opera’s Romance-like style gives it the natural quality, the geniality, and the uniquely cordial lyricism that were intrinsic to the atmosphere of Russian domestic music making in the XIX century… The Romance-style influences not only the opera’s arioso style, but also its recitatives, which are elastic, expressive, and song-like”.

In an interview with radio “Svoboda”, the famous Russian opera singer Galina Vishnevskaya said the following about Tchaikovsky’s opera: “‘Eugene Onegin’ plays a special role in the life of every Russian, whether it be the opera or simply Pushkin’s novel… Because of this, I, for example, have a negative reaction to any attempts at distorting it”.

Precisely for this reason, one of the persistent problems that any opera director encounters is the following dilemma:  how to preserve the opera’s original essence without forgoing a contemporary approach to emotional expression? After all, the most important goal of theater is, first and foremost, to not leave the audience indifferent to the performance on stage. But changing times carry with them a different audience. So this remains a problem that each director must face every time in its totality.

 

“Eugene Onegin” at the Vienna Opera

The role of stage director of “Eugene Onegin” at the Wiener Staatsoper was carried out by the well-known German playwright and director at the “Schaubühne” theater in Berlin, Richter Falk. The opera staged at the Vienna Opera has a long performance history. Richter Falk first staged it in 2009, after which it was given new life when, in 2013, it featured the debut performance of the opera diva Anna Netrebko as Tatiana Larina along with Dmitri Hvorostovsky as Onegin. This performance of Tchaikovsky’s “Lyrical scenes” at the Vienna Opera became one of the most grand events in global opera theater of 2013.

On the one hand, the director strove to preserve the original fable and to emphasize the intimacy with which the characters endure the events that take place. On the other hand, he also tried to take a more contemporary approach in order to give the audience a more direct and vivid perception of the conflicts and collisions in Pushkin’s novel.

This desire on the part of the director to relive every twist and turn in the plot with its original emotional intensity is, without a doubt, derived from the composer’s own conception of the opera’s style. This is what Tchaikovsky himself wrote in one of his letters to his brother Modest: “You won’t believe how much I am yearning for this plot… How happy I am to be rid of any Ethiopian princesses, pharaohs, poisonings, and all other kinds of stiltedness. How boundless is the poetry in Onegin!” While in a letter to the famous Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Taneyev, he emphasized that: “…I have always tried to choose stories involving real, living people, who feel as I do”.

Possibly because of this, the director tried to minimize, as much as possible, any stage decorations that signify the period of time in which the opera is set. In terms of aesthetics, the director takes as a foundation the novel’s motif of winter. Winter imagery becomes a national symbol, as well a metaphor for Onegin’s cold indifference.

The director utilized the most common stereotypical imagery that Old Europe associates with Russia: snow, ice, cold, fur, vodka. It is undoubtedly the case, that some of these images could have been avoided, while others could have been developed with greater subtlety and ambiguity. For instance, the ice bed covered with bear hides that Tatiana Larina slept on appeared fairly comical to a Russian audience.

The use of snow as stage decoration became an “idee fixe”.  The amount of snow that falls throughout the show’s duration seems excessive even for a Russian audience! It’s worth pointing out, that Tchaikovsky’s opera has stage directions that specify seasonal changes, which occur as the plot develops. So, for instance, it is very difficult to imagine the first Act taking place in a Russian winter, especially given the fact that Tchaikovsky’s music is filled with a summer-like atmosphere and uses warm, at times even sultry intonations. It is unfortunate that the director paid no attention to one of the novel’s and opera’s important qualities: that the plot develops in conjunction with seasonal changes that occur in nature. This is not accidental! The changes in nature carry with them an entire universe of corresponding psychological changes and imagery.

It is also impossible to imagine Russian aristocracy drinking vodka at a ball, a detail which seemed out of place within the opera. Even more out of place was the Finale of the Ball scene, in which members of Russian nobility enter into a fist fight, while Lensky, in a fit of passion, pushes Olga to the ground (!!).

Another stumbling block, which hindered the emergence of an organic synthesis between the music and stage performance, were the dance numbers during the ball. They were presented to the audience more in a “club aesthetic”, rather than a ball-like one. The “dances on tables” did not fit Tchaikovsky’s music whatsoever; music which the famous Russian musicologist Boris Asafyev called the “era’s intonational dictionary”, meaning that Pyotr Ilyich was able to achieve an astounding synthesis of all types of musical intonation that were present during the noble Romantic Era of the Russian Empire in the first half of the XIX century. For this reason, melodies from various types of peasant songs fit seamlessly into the opera’s musical texture, while the dance genres recreate the atmosphere of the St. Petersburg aristocratic ball.

Yet, in spite of all these absurdities, the opera’s direction does have some interesting moments. For example, one of the performance’s undeniable successes is its staging of the opera’s final scene. The ball at the Gremin’s was staged entirely in a Gothic style. The members of noble society were all dressed in black, a bright steel staircase stretched across the entire width of the stage, along with tall columns, – all of these scenographic resources created a feeling of nobility and hopelessness in the Finale.

Another interesting scenographic device was the curtain design, which was stylized after Tatiana’s letter to Onegin.

The multinational cast of singers shined in the vocal parts. The role of Tatiana was sung by the Russian soprano Olga Bessmertnaya, a soloist at the Bolshoi Theater, the role of Onegin was performed by the British baritone Christopher Maltman, Olga was performed by the young St. Petersburg singer Ilseyar Khayrullova, in the role of Lensky – the famous Slovakian tenor Pavol Breslik, and in the role of Gremin – the Finnish bass Mika Kares. It’s worth noting that the part of Gremin was the young Finnish singer’s debut performance at the Vienna Opera.

It was particularly gratifying to hear the singers’ excellent pronunciation of the Russian text, which was perfected to the smallest detail. With the exception of a few Russian letters (“r”, “e”, “y”, and “l”), which have a very particular articulation, one could hardly believe that the performers were not Russian speakers. This excellent pronunciation was also present in the choir’s singing, which performed Russian songs in Act I.

Also pleasing was the sincerely warm participation of the Austrian public. The audience listened to each aria with great pleasure, many of which have become hits a long time ago. The final applause lasted a long time and the performers were called back on stage many times. One can say without a doubt, that the Russian opera’s Vienna performance was a triumph!

** Boris Vladimirovich Asafyev (1884-1949) A Russian-Soviet composer, musicologist, and music critic. He is the author of the book “Musical Form as a Process” (the second part of which is titled “Intonation”). He is the founder of a method of form analysis in Russian musicology based on intonation, who also studied theoretical problems which deal with music’s unique characteristics, the process-like nature of musical form, as well as creating the “theory of intonation”.

 

The writer is Yana Rossi

The translation – Ilya Baburashvili

 

Direction of authentic and relevant meanings

Direction of authentic and relevant meanings

Staging of «Siegfried» from Wagner’s Ring Cycle at the Vienna Opera

During its 2016-2017 season, the Wiener Staatsoper has continued to perform its interpretation of Wagner’s famous masterpiece, the Ring Cycle. Having witnessed a performance of the cycle’s third part, one can’t help but point out, that it possesses the same authentic Wagnerian character, that one feels in his music, where any boundaries between reality and myth are erased, and a new world in born right before the audiences’ eyes; one with its own gravitational force  and its own rules and norms. There wasn’t a single detail which looked like a naïve fantasy (as compared with the sorts of computer effects that we regularly observe in modern cinematography), or a deliberate anachronism, emerging from the depths of grand Romantic opera. While the use of contemporary computer graphics was very appropriate and complemented the ascetic and minimalistic traditional scenography.  

The question of how Wagner’s grand creation was brought to life at the Wiener Staatsoper will be discussed in this article. To begin, let us immerse ourselves in its history and recall the main stages of its creation. This will help us understand how the authentic musical material and its direction relate to each other in a stage performance.

The main figure of Siegfried in the composition of the Ring Cycle

As we know, Wagner’s grandiose Ring Cycle developed within the composer’s mind gradually. He began his search around the character of Siegfried.

In 1848, Wagner wrote a poetic text titles “The Nibelungs”, based on the myth of the Nibelungs, which, in its broad characteristics, served as an outline for the Ring Cycle.

Having completed the outline, Wagner then composed a three act opera “Siegfried’s Death”.  Its plot was based on the final part of “The Nibelungs”.

Then, due to several circumstances (such as the May 1848 Uprising), his work on the epic was interrupted. It is known, that during this period the composer was not in high spirits, because he felt that his new composition went radically outside the bounds of traditional opera. Only in 1851 did Wagner return to the idea of “Siegfried”, writing the opera “Young Siegfried”, which served as s kind of introduction to “Siegfried’s Death”.

However, upon completion, the composer felt the myth had not been explored deeply enough, which led him to develop it into a trilogy: “The Valkerie”,  “Young Siegfried”, and “Siegfried’s Death”, with a prologue titled “Stealing the Rhinegold”.

Work on the grandiose operas was done intermittently, while during the breaks, Wagner was able to complete ‘Tristan and Isolde” and “The Mastersingers of Nuremberg”.

After completing the Cycle, Wagner was faced with the problem of its staging. This was the moment when Wagner conceived of the idea of creating a theater specifically designed for performing the Ring Cycle. This lead to the creation of the Festspielhaus theater, which was constructed with the support of many Wagnerian societies and the personal patronage of the Bavarian King Ludwig II. In 1876, the Cycle’s long awaited premiere at Bayreuth finally took place.

Authentic meanings in opera in terms of Wagner’s thinking

It is precisely while working on the Ring Cycle that Wagner definitively formulated the main principles of his opera aesthetic. In this respect, his most important work is the book “Opera and Drama” (1851). In it, Wagner writes of his dream of creating a theatrical art form which would be analogous to that of Ancient Greece. As we know, during grandiose celebrations, one of the factors which united the Greek people was theater tragedy. According to Wagner, the Ancient Greeks created a real drama, based on mythology. For it is precisely myth, which reveals the link between eternal events in the most comprehensive and universal way.

The composer strongly criticized the circumstances in which contemporary European theater found itself in. In his view, it lacked its own form of musical drama, which could be compared to Ancient Greek theater.

For this reason, in his own dramas (particularly in the Ring Cycle), Wagner created a type of performance which, according to him, could compete with Greek tragedy. He strove to create the utmost unity. The operas have a powerful symphonic development which penetrates the entire work, a system of leitmotifs, a synthesis of vocal and instrumental parts – all of these tools of musical expression were, according to Wagner, meant to create a drama which could be, on the one hand, a worthy successor to Greek tragedy, while on the other hand, also being able to compete with it.

Relevant meanings of Wagner’s operatic drama and their continuation in modern culture

In his art, the composer attempted to lay the foundation on which our culture could develop and create new and exiting art forms of the future. So, what was the result? How did future generations react to Richard Wagner’s artistic goals and his calls for a new art form?

For a long time, modern musicology has considered the German Classic to be one of the first composers who turned to myth, interpreting in as a system with which to comprehend the world. In this sense, the Ring Cycle can quite naturally be seen as one of the main sources of myth-based artistic tendencies in modern culture. So, in her book “Richard Wagner’s Ring Cycle” (1997), N.S. Nikolaeva introduces the terms “actualization of myth”, implying that myth can become an expression of universal content; or, to put it another way, it can be “for all time”. Wagner himself wrote the following: “If we imagine that, instead of the fateful ring, the Nibelung has in his hand a business briefcase, then we will have a complete image of the frightening, elusive master of the world”[1]. Wotan is “a composite of all modern intelligentsia, while Siegfried is the coveted and longed for person of the future”[2], writes N.S. Nikolaeva.

As we know, any myth is a personified image of the world. This has always been mythology’s inner purpose. It can be noted that, myth penetrates all of modern culture. For instance, a significant part of modern television and cinema are, in one way or another, connected to myth and are either interpretations of well known mythological imagery and conflict, or are new myths, which are based on the motifs of the old ones. It’s no secret, that numerous action films, which have recently become so ubiquitous, recreate themes from popular mythology, including righteous revenge, revenge in the name of duty, murder in the name of brotherhood. To put it briefly, what we see here is resurrection of pagan moral values. In recent cinema history, all of these ideas are abundantly present in such epics as “Star Wars”, “Game of Thrones”, and the films “Salt”, “Wanted”, “Sin City”, “Sin City 2: A Dame to Kill For” and many others, along with numerous Russian films and TV shows, which were based on Hollywood sources (“Night Watch”, “Day Watch”, “Method” and others). Modern mythology has also permeated the opera scene: in 2015 the Stanislavsky Electrotheater launched its opera series “Sverliytsy”.

What are the similarities and differences between the approach of modern culture to myth versus Wagner’s approach? Who are we, successors or imitators?

Let us note that, throughout his entire career, Wagner sought to reconstruct all the greatest aspects of Greek tragedy. So, for him, recreating and reconstructing a myth within a musical drama meant creating an artifact of modern art, which was similar to and no less exiting then Greek tragedy, and giving it a truly universal ethical meaning.

In today’s pop culture (the film and TV industries), one can detect a fundamentally different approach. Typically, what we see is either a parasitism on mythological sources, or even parody of myth. Mythology becomes a tool for manipulating the masses. “Like myths, works of modern pop culture are based on the lack distinction between the ideal and the real”3. Moreover, with regards to modern culture, one can add: the lack of differentiation between the good and the bad, the intelligent and the stupid, the witty and the vulgar. The primary measure of quality becomes the intensity of the audience’s emotional reaction to what is on screen. Meanwhile, the ethical, and even more so, the aesthetic side are not given any attention or are completely ignored. The main slogan becomes “Bread and circuses!”, only in our modern interpretation- pleasant circuses. The boundaries between such opposite categories as old and new, good and evil, beautiful and ugly are erased, while the main dramaturgical tool becomes “shock value” and the “principle of non-distinction”.

Thus, despite its apparent external similarities, Wagner’s myth-art appears as a lonely, abandoned island within the modern world! However, because opera still remains a fairly popular genre, each team of opera directors and producers is faced with the same question: how to bring Wagner’s authentic meanings to life on stage for a contemporary audience, who has become accustomed to the insanely high sensory impact that effects in television and video games can have? After all, whether one wants to or not, one has to find ways to compete with modern forms of media!

The opera “Siegfried” and the Ring Cycle at the Vienna Opera

The version of Wagner’s epic currently playing in Vienna is a worthy answer to the above question! This interpretation began its life on stage in the spring of 2008. Its director was Sven-Eric Bechtolf, while the scenographer was Rudolf Glittenberg.

On the one hand, this production of “Siegfried” has a distinctly traditional tone: the action unfolds in accordance with every one of the plot’s and score’s turning points. On the other hand, in terms of the action and scenography itself, there is much that is connected with our modern world. Wotan is dressed in a leather cape, Siegfried is in World War II era camouflage, the Nibelung dwarf Mime is in a glamorous coat with a stylish scarf, while Brunnhilde wears a silver nightgown. As a result, it seems as though everything occurs in a kind of timeless mythological dimension. In this way, the production achieves a harmonious balance between the traditional and the modern, while maintaining an overall appearance which is effective and stylish. Without even slightly violating any of Wagner’s principle concerns, the myth is brought to life before the audience, in a way that brings it closer to our modern perception.

One of the production’s most successful scenographic tools is its subtle use of digital video projection. Thus, the scenographers were able to find an organic realization of the snake-like dragon Fafner. When we hear his voice, in the background we see a scarcely blinking giant eye, possibly that of a reptile or a bird. Within the pupil, the video artists occasionally release flaming sparks, which underscore his evil and ferocious temper. As a result, the desired effect is achieved: the powerful Siegfried, who in previous scenes appeared next to the dwarf Mime, now himself looks like a dwarf next to Fafner’s giant eye!

What distinguished the musical interpretation was a truly superb quality of sound! Behind the conductor’s stand was Peter Schneider, who has already become a well known interpreter of Wagner’s music. For many years, he has been the director of the Manheim and Munich opera theaters, and has, for over 35 years, served as the principle conductor of Wagner’s operas in Bayreuth. This prolonged immersion into Wagner’s musical texture is tangible in the performance: the orchestra sounded powerful and yet distinct, the orchestral colors were strikingly diverse, while the singer’s voices seemed to be welded into the orchestral score.

On stage, the wonderful singing ensemble shined. The main roles were sung by: the German tenor Stefan Vinke (Siegfried), the Austrian tenor Wolfgang Ablinger-Sperrhacke (Mime), the German mezzo-soprano Petra Lang (Brunnhilde) [winner of two Grammy awards for her role as Cassandra in Berlioz’s opera The Trojans], the Polish baritone Tomas Conechny (Wotan), and the German baritone Jochen Schmeckenbecher (Alberich). Their voices and manner of singing conformed with the prevailing conception of a Wagner soloist.

Thus, the production’s most important feature became its harmonious synthesis of Wagner’s traditional musical and stage images with a competent and balanced inclusion of modern attributes. The director and production team managed to find the authentic meanings, which are present in the score, and to realize them on stage in a way that’s relevant in today’s era. Finally, thanks to a first-rate musical performance, the multi-part opera could be listened to in one single breath!

The writer is Yana Rossi

The translation – Ilya Baburashvili

[1] R. Wagner «Memoirs».Volume 4. p. 181

2 N.S. Nikolaeva «”Richard Wagner’s Ring Cycle». M., 1997. p. 7

3 I.A. Kovaleva Myth-based art in modern culture // The Young Scientst. — 2015. — №9.1. — p. 37-40.

Russian Musical Passion in Xiamen

Russian Musical Passion in Xiamen

It’s hard to imagine the suffering Russian people endured between the 1st performance of Tchaikovsky’s piano concerto no.1 and the premier

In Tucson fire was kin of prominent Russian composer

In Tucson fire was kin of prominent Russian composer

Alexander Temple Wolkonsky Rachmaninoff Wanamaker, 23, was found in a room of a burning home in midtown early Thursday morning.

Cornelius Dufallo runs into plenty of composers

Cornelius Dufallo runs into plenty of composers

As a member of the enterprising new-music ensembles Ne(x)tworks and Ethel, the violinist Cornelius Dufallo runs into plenty of composers.

Vladimir Ashkenazy – Malaysia should have a conservatory

Vladimir Ashkenazy – Malaysia should have a conservatory

And according to virtuoso pianist, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Malaysians are already groomed for a classical music awakening. The Russian is ranked as one

Persons
Ingo Metzmacher – I can’t believe it!

Ingo Metzmacher – I can’t believe it!

The well-known maestro, active propagandist of modern music, the one, who all Europe worships – Ingo Metzmacher has visited Moscow. Despite a number of possible difficulties – some heavy days, and, in addition, Friday 13, good luck has smiled to our magazine, and we managed to meet the adherent of modern music world and ask him some questions, to some of which he has reacted extremely directly.

Editor's Column
Stuart Lawson: «Time-proven Pursuit of Excellence»

Stuart Lawson: «Time-proven Pursuit of Excellence»

The hero of today’s interview is like no other. First, he is not a musician but a banker. But obviously he is not an ordinary banker as we are not a business publication and write only about things related to classical music. Stuart Lawson is CEO of HSBC Russia. The bank has won praise for a series of events it organized together with the Gnessin Moscow School of Music

The World of Classical Music
  • The Start of the Alan Gilbert Era

    The Start of the Alan Gilbert Era

    Shakespeare wrote that people are either born great, achieve greatness, or have greatness “thrust upon them.” In the case of the New York Philharmonic’s

Artist Recitals
  • William Preucil will give recital

    William Preucil will give recital

    The Department of Music at Ashland University has scheduled a guest artist recital featuring William Preucil, violinist and concertmaster for the Cleveland Orchestra

Classical music festivals
  • John Adams is feeling festive

    John Adams is feeling festive

    John Adams sits in the audience during rehearsal with the Berkeley Symphony at Zellerbach Hall at UC Berkeley on Oct. 14.

Classical Competitions and Awards
New Media
Music magazines
Concert Hall
  • Perform at Royal Concert Hall

    Perform at Royal Concert Hall

    BBC’s Last Choir Standing winners Only Men Aloud will perform in Glasgow next week. The Welsh choir are back with a very special Christmas-themed tour

Master-class
  • Alfred Brendel Gives Master Class

    Alfred Brendel Gives Master Class

    Alfred Brendel is classical-music royalty. He is a pianist who burst onto the scene in the late 1950s and who has since maintained his own identifiable sound